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Many women across the globe are harnessing their passions and talents to create thriving businesses and pursue fulfilling careers. Every day, more women are turning their passion projects into profitable ventures that not only generate income but also drive economic growth and empowerment. This article explores how women can transform their passion projects into profitable careers, drawing on real-life examples and practical advice.

1. Identifying Your Passion

The first step in turning a passion project into a profitable career is identifying what you’re passionate about. Whether it’s fashion design, food entrepreneurship, or social activism, your passion should be the driving force behind your business venture. Take the time to reflect on your interests, skills, and values to identify a niche that aligns with your passions and has the potential for profitability.

2. Developing Your Skills and Expertise

Once you’ve identified your passion, invest in developing your skills and expertise in your chosen field. Take advantage of training programs, workshops, and online courses to acquire the knowledge and skills you need to succeed. Whether it’s learning new techniques in your craft or mastering business management principles, continuous learning and skill development are essential for building a successful career from your passion project.

3. Creating a Solid Business Plan

A solid business plan is essential for turning your passion project into a profitable career. Outline your business goals, target market, competitive analysis, and marketing strategy to guide your business growth and development. A well-thought-out business plan not only helps you clarify your vision but also serves as a roadmap for achieving your goals and securing financing if needed.

4. Building Your Brand

Building a strong brand is key to standing out in a competitive market and attracting customers to your passion project-turned-business. Define your brand identity, including your brand values, personality, and visual elements such as logo and packaging. Establishing a strong brand presence across your chosen social media channels, websites, and offline promotions helps to build brand awareness and loyalty among your target audience.

5. Leveraging Technology and Digital Tools

In today’s digital age, embracing digital tools and platforms that can help you showcase your products or services, manage your finances, and connect with customers online is crucial. Utilizing e-commerce platforms, social media, and digital marketing strategies can significantly expand your reach and enhance your business operations.

6. Seeking Mentorship and Networking Opportunities

Mentorship and networking are invaluable resources for women entrepreneurs looking to turn their passion projects into profitable careers. Connect with experienced mentors, industry experts, and fellow entrepreneurs who can offer guidance, advice, and support along your entrepreneurial journey. Joining networking groups, attending industry events, and participating in entrepreneurship programs can help you expand your network and access new opportunities for growth and collaboration.

With determination, creativity, and strategic planning, women can achieve success in their entrepreneurial pursuits and create a lasting impact in their communities and beyond. By transforming their passion projects into profitable careers, women are not only achieving personal fulfillment but also contributing to the broader economic and social landscape.

 The buzzwords going around this first month of the year are Goals and Goal-Setting! Throughout the media, Internet and even in the Board Rooms, Goal setting is BIG. It’s everywhere and everyone is talking about how important it is to set your goals.

Before now goal setting was considered a masculine activity. Women relish in their ability to multi-task and get loads of things done at the same time and quickly too, so they shy away from setting clear, specific and meaningful goals. Many female entrepreneurs still have not realised the power of setting effective business goals.

To be a female entrepreneur without business goals is like getting in the car and driving around town without a clear direction of where you are going!

It is impossible to really know if your daily activities and strategies are moving you in the right direction if you do not set business goals.

Can you imagine getting in the car to go shopping without knowing what market or shop you want to go to or where they are located? That is precisely what you do when you begin your business year without a goal in mind.

Not only should you set goals for your business, you should also map out strategies on how you will achieve each goal and set deadlines. Goals should be written down and reviewed over time to ensure you are hitting your targets. Here are a few tips to help you set achievable goals in 2017.

Identify What You Want

The first real step to an effective goal setting is knowing what you want in life. As simple as that may sound if you ask many people what they want and where they would realistically want to be in a year, two years or five years, they do not have a clue. Speak to employers of labour, I’m sure they can relate!

So sit down and work out what you truly want in life, business, family, career and even leisure. There is an excellent tool you can use as guide called ‘The Wheel of Life’.

Make Your Goals Holistic

Set goals in every area of your life – Social, Family, Business, Relationships, Leisure, Spiritual and Financial Goals.

Write Your Goals Down

Write down your goals as often as you can. Our brain cannot keep a tab on all our thoughts so, Write Them Down! Remember, The faintest ink is more powerful than the strongest memory!

Keep It Simple

Do not overwhelm yourself with too many goals. You cannot change everything in a day. And everything you want in life cannot be achieved in one single year. So keep it real, keep it simple!! Take consistent action and over time, you will get to where you want to be

One Step At A Time

Don’t get overwhelmed with goals that seem too far-fetched and unrealistic. They should be realistic and achievable. For example if you are a jewelry maker and you currently make 10 jewelry sets a week. Would it make sense to increase to 100 a week from 10? A more realistic goal would be 15-20 a week and when you achieve that you can increase again to 25 -30. In other words, set incremental goals and build the momentum. This way your Goals Will Be Achievable Or Doable.

Record Your Milestones

Track your progress and list your accomplishments as you go along. This is important because when you hit setbacks and get frustrated, your achievement so far will help you stay encouraged and focused.

Reward Yourself

Whenever you have achieved a set goal, reward yourself. This helps you to stay motivated.Clearly, from these few tips, goal setting is definitely not as complex and scary as it sometimes appears. Setting goals is only designed to help stretch you and make you grow.

Nonetheless after following these steps, if you don’t take action to execute all you have put down, your goals will be nothing but dreams or a mere wish and that doesn’t take you anywhere but leaves you worse than the person who didn’t write at all! So, take charge of your goals and focus on achieving great results. You can do it!

Entrepreneurs are known to possess specific skills that fuel their desires to start, manage, and succeed in a business venture. These traits, however, are also being seen as contributing negatively to their mental health at a given time in their lifetime.

Recent investigations indicate that entrepreneurs are more likely to suffer mental illness. According to Michael Freeman, a psychiatrist, psychologist, and former CEO, entrepreneurs are 50 percent more probable to report having a mental health breakdown, with some particular conditions being more prevalent among founders.

In a recent study, Dr. Freeman observed that up to 72 percent of entrepreneurs surveyed self-reported mental health issues.

THE FINDINGS FROM THE RESEARCH INDICATE THAT ENTREPRENEURS ARE:
  • Twice as likely to suffer from depression
  • Six times more likely to suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • Three times more likely to suffer from substance abuse
  • 10 times more likely to suffer from bipolar disorder
  • Twice as likely to have a psychiatric hospitalization
  • Twice as likely to have suicidal thoughts

Let’s talk about Mental Health

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), mental health is not merely the absence of mental health challenges.

It is the “state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community”.

Also known as mental well-being (MWB), mental health, which is traditionally studied in medicine, psychology, and public health, is increasingly gaining attention in other disciplines as well.

Scientists, psychologists, economists, management experts among many other experts are taking an interest in the mental health issues of entrepreneurs.

The experts have concluded that mental disorders are not only common but may, in fact, fuel the entrepreneurial spirit.

According to Michael Freeman – executive coach to entrepreneurs and clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California-San Francisco School of Medicine…

“Mental health conditions are accompanied by positive traits that enable entrepreneurs to excel.”

Take ADHD, a condition that research suggests is more prominent among entrepreneurial types.

“If you have ADHD, two of the positive traits are a need for speed and an interest in exploration and recognizing opportunities,” he says. “[you have] an ability to act without getting stuck with analysis paralysis.”

Entrepreneurs are recognized as contributing to economic growth, innovation, and job creation across the world. They do so by identifying and addressing the needs in a particular market.

The late Steve Jobs referring to entrepreneurs said, “People who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do.”   

In the midst of stiff competition and many challenges, entrepreneurs have to employ strict and strategic measures to remain in business. By so doing, these business-oriented individuals often neglect their wellbeing in a bid to grow their ventures.

Although in the past, entrepreneurs’ mental health has not received much attention, recently, leaders across the world have begun discussing mental health issues to create awareness on the matter.

Earlier this year at the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos. World leaders including the UK’s Prince William, CEO of HSBC, among others, shed light on mental health problems in a therapeutic and non-stigmatic way.

The mental health crisis in start-ups

With such alarming and scary statistics, the question is: why are entrepreneurs more likely to experience mental health issues?

Speaking from his Nairobi office, director of Consulting and Training at People Centric Management Company, Ken Munyua shared with us insights on the following seven areas that make entrepreneurs more susceptible to mental problems.

1. Fear of failure/uncertainty

“Fear of failure has crippled many people even before trying,” observes Munyua.

Uncertainty and anxiety contribute negatively to our mental well-being. With so much competition, uncertainty is ever a looming phenomenon among entrepreneurs.

Remaining positive and pressing on in the time of our powerlessness should be the ultimate goal for any businessman/woman.

“Get out there and try; if it does not work, use the experience to improve on your next venture, Munyua advises.”

2. Social isolation

Incognizant of how they contribute to mental problems, those close to the entrepreneurs can create a social gap through alienation.

While entrepreneurs are excited about the new venture, often, the society including friends and family fail to offer the needed support.

Choosing to the non-traditional path can bring about social isolation as one focuses all energy and time into succeeding in the business.

3. Stress

Munyua notes that in the formative stage, in particular, entrepreneurs require more time to start and ensure the business survives.

During this time, many people in business are pressed hard in managing both business and social life.

Over time, the stress leads to sleepless nights, overworking, and lack of appetite or skipping meals due to work and the problems keep spilling over, which can lead to depression if the stress is not addressed well on time.

4. Impression management

One thing that entrepreneurs do well is acting like everything is working even at the edge of failure.

By creating this facade, entrepreneurs do not seek help even when they need it as they do not want to appear weak.

This disconnect between personal experiences, and what they share with the public creates insecurity, and a sense of confusion, further leading to stress, and consequently depression.

5. Inadequate resources to address mental health

Mental health resources in entrepreneurship, as is the case in other fields, receive little or no support.

As organizations and firms come together to fund and support budding as well as existing entrepreneurs, factors such as mental wellbeing of the businessmen and women should be factored into the budget.

6. Too many expectations

Munyua observes that Carl Rodgers, a renowned psychologist, warns that human beings are disturbed when expectations are not met. “Always hope for the best but prepare for the worst,” Munyua adds.

Our mantra should be “expect nothing, and be prepared for anything,” as the saying by the Samurai of ancient Japan goes. We should be open-minded about the eventualities that might come; both positive and negative.

Munyua calls on entrepreneurs to have a go-to person (s) who is ready to support and invest in your well-being.

Moreover, establish a routine that allows you time off business or any other work-related duties. Use this time to rest and rejuvenate physically, spiritually, and mentally.

 

Article written by Maureen Murori

 

 

 

Culled from sheleadsafrica.org

Photo credit: google.com

Fashion entrepreneur, Mocheddah, has taken to her IG page to recount how being an adult and entrepreneur in Nigeria makes her cry a lot. She posted the photo above on her IG page and wrote

This is me —

After a goooood cry ?, I had to wipe my tears , drink tea , get on the phone and get work done .

40% of my time is spent on the phone talking , I do not wish it so but it is , I’m either talking to staff , a supplier or trying to get logistic companies to “do their job “on time because customers need their orders .. .

Another 40% is spent on the field , in the sun buying materials I would need or on an okada trying to meet up with a delivery, ( I’ll post the picture soon ) 
The last 20% is what I have left for myself , family and other businesses I run … .

.It is HARD , I cry , I cry a lot ???.. .

that’s the only way you can survive as a Nigerian business owner … .

Do not let my Instagram slay pictures deceive you , being an ADULT is HARD work, being an entrepreneur is even HARDER .. .

If you must chop you must work 
On the brighter side God rewards hard work … so you will always reap what you have sewn .. I’m writing this to let someone out there know it’s hard for me too … but we will survive .. PS- try drinking green tea – it makes it easier ??

Credit: LIB

On Saturday, November 17th, 5 female entrepreneurs will be pitching for N5m in funding at the Demo Day of the She Leads Africa Accelerator.  The Demo Day is the closing ceremony for the 3-month program designed to identify, support and fund the next generation of Nigeria’s brightest entrepreneurs. During the Demo Day, each entrepreneur will have just 5 minutes to pitch their case to a panel of esteemed judges including Odun Eweniyi (Co-founder, Piggybank), Akintunde Oyebode (Executive Secretary, LSETF), and Adia Sowho (VP of Commercial, Mines.io).

Date: Saturday, November 17th, 2018

After a rigorous application process, 10 entrepreneurs were selected from hundreds of applicants to join the 2018 accelerator cohort. The 10 candidates convened in Lagos for 3 residency weeks over 3 months where they received training in business strategy, financial modelling, digital marketing, talent acquisition and more.

The final stage of the process is the Demo Day where the top 5 participants, as selected by their peers have the opportunity to pitch for funding. First place gets N5m, second place, N2m and 3rd place, N1m.

Limited seats are available for this event. If interested in attending, please email programs@sheleadsafrica.org with your name and company.

 

 

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Keri Hilson, American singer, songwriter, and actress, and Angelica Nwandu, Founder of The Shade Room, #1 black-owned independent media company covering entertainment & celebrity news, will join thousands of entrepreneurs and global leaders next week in Lagos Nigeria for the TEF Forum.

Hosted by the Tony Elumelu Foundation, the TEF Forum which is scheduled to hold on Thursday, October 25, 2018 in Lagos, is the largest gathering of African entrepreneurs and the broader entrepreneurship ecosystem which unites over 5,000 entrepreneurs, global investors, leaders from the African public and private sectors and developmental organisations at Lagos Nigeria.

Aside from the Founder’s Dialogue, one of the major highlights of the Forum, other speakers will include Dr. Awele Elumelu, Chairperson, Avon Healthcare, TEF Trustee and Gavi Champion for Immunisation in Africa; Eleni Giokos, CNNMoney Africa Correspondent and Mayeni Jones, BBC Correspondent.

So far, international and local media – CNN, BBC, CNBC Africa, Africa24, Ebonylife TV, NTA – have partnered with the Tony Elumelu Foundation to share the inspiring story of Africa’s most promising entrepreneurs with the world.

Last year, Angelica Nwandu on her panel on branding and marketing, shared insights on how she built the multimillion-dollar brand, Shade Room, from ground up.

 

Credit: LIB

Serial entrepreneur, Toyin Lawani is now the latest author in town!

The fashion mogul has just unveiled her new book titled Be Unstoppable in which she’s sharing The Business Mogul’s Guide.

According to her, the purpose of the book is to share a few business tips that have worked for her over the years and her personal experiences in business with hopes that it can answer any questions that you may have as a startup or as an entrepreneur who is already in business.

See more photos below:

A Nigerian startup, BabyMigo, founded by Adeloye Olanrewaju, has been named as one of Time Magazine’s 50 Genius Companies.

Babymigo was specifically selected for creating and being a community for new and expectant mothers.

(Photo: Babymigo)

Babymigo is an online community that connects mothers-to-be with information, medical experts, services and other parents. The platform is also equipped with an SMS subscription service for pregnant women that informs them of prenatal appointments and their babies’ development.

Since inception, the response has been huge, and the Babymigo team has since tapped into a massive, unmet demand for Africa-centric pregnancy, birth and baby information. The app has been downloaded over 30,000 times and its mobile-friendly website has over 90,000 registered users.

(Photo: Babymigo)

Adeloye says:

“There are 10.4 million babies born every year in Nigeria, and every one of those mothers is hungry for the kind of information we provide.”

Earlier this year, the company was one of the inaugural set of African startups to go through the Google’s Africa Launchpad Accelerator program, which afforded a $10,000 grant — just one of the company’s many well-deserved achievements.